How to Counter a Job Offer in a Negotiateble Way

How to Counter a Job Offer

How to counter a job offer. Are you unhappy with the income or benefits been offered for a new job? Writing a counteroffer letter can help you land you have the job you desire with the salary you deserve. This essay is the ideal resource for you.

how to counter a job offer

What is a Counter Offer?

A job applicant makes a counteroffer to an employer in response to an unsatisfactory job offer. Job seekers have a few options for submitting a counteroffer to an employer:

‣ Meet with the employer for an in-person negotiation.

‣ Speak with the employer over the phone.

‣ Write a counteroffer letter.

The last option presents a solid starting point for the discussion. A counteroffer letter is a written or email response by the applicant to the employer’s original job offer.

Candidates often emphasize their continued interest in a position in a counteroffer letter, but they request a revision in the terms of the previous offer.

A counteroffer letter may include details about your proposal or just request a meeting to discuss pay.

A counteroffer letter—a written or email response by the candidate to the employer’s original employment offer—is one of the most typical ways to make a counteroffer.

Candidates often emphasize their continued interest in a position in a counteroffer letter, but they want a revision in the terms of the initial offer.

Benefits of Writing a Counteroffer Letter

There are several reasons why you should write a counteroffer rather than meeting or calling an employer, including:

It can relax you. For applicants who are hesitant to negotiate in person, writing a counteroffer letter is excellent.

It could benefit your writing abilities. Because they can clearly describe what they want in diplomatic words, strong and effective writers are in the ideal position to compose a counteroffer.

It’s easy to document the exchange. Conversing in writing also leaves a useful paper trail. With an exchange of letters or emails, any agreed-upon changes are cemented in writing.

When to Write a Counteroffer Letter

When you’re unhappy with an employer’s initial compensation plan, consider submitting a counter offer letter.

If the income provided is too low for your needs or experience, or you believe the benefits package is missing important perks, such as an acceptable amount of paid vacation days, you may want to submit a counteroffer.

Companies frequently consider counteroffers, albeit they may not accept all (or any) of the requests in the offer.

Small organizations, for example, may reject your offer if they can’t afford to pay more than a certain salary range for your position.

Furthermore, any company of any size can reject your counteroffer if it offends or offends them.

Employers can lawfully withdraw a job offer at any time since employees in all states (excluding Montana) are “employed at will”—that is, both the employer and the employee have the freedom to end the job at any time.

Do some study if you want to create a counteroffer letter but aren’t sure how the company will react. To discover more about the corporate culture in terms of salary, go to sites like Glassdoor and LinkedIn. Letter of counter-offer

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How to Decide on a Counter Offer

When deciding on a counteroffer, examine your salary—specifically, how much you need to comfortably satisfy your demands in your current location.

However, it is advisable to consider the total pay package. Other non-salary compensation modifications you can request include relocation expenses, insurance, signing bonuses, vacation and sick days, and other benefits.

You can also offer benefits specific to your office, such as your workspace, working hours, or telecommuting opportunities.

Using an online salary calculator, research the usual income for people in the job you want, both within the firm and nationally.

You may make a more informed judgment regarding your desired compensation package once you have a feel of your worth. Letter of counter-offer

How to Write a Counter Offer Letter

Use a pleasant and professional tone when writing a counteroffer letter, and describe your pay expectations clearly and concisely. Make your counteroffer look like a formal or business letter by following these steps:

1. Fill in the following information: Include your full name, address, and contact information, the date, and the employer’s full name, title, and address in the upper left corner of your letter.

Address the recruiting manager with a professional salutation, such as “Dear Ms. Gammond.”

2. Make a formal introduction: Begin your letter by thanking the hiring manager for the job offer and expressing your interest in the position with a brief introduction (typically two or three phrases). Letter of counter-offer

Explain why you believe you are the ideal candidate for the job so that the employer understands your importance to the organization and why you are worth more money.

3. Clearly outline the company’s offer and your counteroffer in the body of the letter, along with why you believe it is justified.

If you’re discussing numerous sections of the pay package, make a new paragraph for each counteroffer.

“Corrigan Media’s offer of $45,000 is generous, but I’d want to respond with $52,000, which is the national average income for graphic designers,” for example.

4. Finish the letter with: Reiterate your desire to work for the organization and why your counteroffer is reasonable. Thank them for their time and offer to meet with the hiring manager to discuss your salary in person.

5. Add a closing salutation: Use a formal salutation such as “Respectfully” or “Sincerely,” followed by your full name and signature.

This straightforward format allows the employer to easily read and understand your counteroffer and decide how they want to respond. Counter offer letter.

how to counter a job offer

What to include in a Counteroffer Letter

Make it easier for the employer to address and accept the intended adjustments to the original offer by articulating them in plain, easy-to-understand terms:

1. Header

Format your letter as a regular business letter. Include a header with information about the employer and your contact information. The letter should be addressed to the employer.

2. Introduction

Begin by emphasizing your interest in the company and one or two key reasons why you are an ideal candidate for the job. This will remind the employer why they wanted to hire you and why you are worth the extra money and/or benefits.

3. Body of the Letter

You can propose a meeting with the employer in the body of the letter, and be generic about the adjustments you desire until the meeting.

Alternatively, specify the modifications in the letter itself. If you choose the latter, write a brief paragraph for each component of the compensation package that you want to negotiate. How to counter a job offer.

Declare the original offer, your counteroffer, and why you believe the counteroffer is suitable in each paragraph.

Explain that their offer was below the national average income for the job after you’ve stated your initial and desired salaries. Letter of counter-offer. How to counter a job offer.

4. Conclusion

Reiterate how reasonable your request is and how pleased you are to work for the organization. You might even offer to meet with the employer in person to discuss the situation further or just inform them to contact you.

5. Subject Line

If you’re sending the counteroffer letter as an email, the subject line should include your name and the reason you’re writing, such as “Your Name – Job Offer.” How to counter a job offer.

Counteroffer Letter Examples

Use these counter offer letters as templates when you need to request changes to a job offer.

Letter Requesting a Meeting

This sample counter offer letter requests a meeting to discuss the compensation package that was offered.

Letter Example

Subject Line: Lisa Wong – Job Offer

Dear Ms. Gonzalez,

Thank you for your offer of the position of Regional Manager of Product Development for the Witten Company.

I am impressed with the depth of knowledge of your development team and believe that my experience will help to maximize the profitability of the department.

I would like to meet with you regarding the salary and benefits you have offered before I make a final decision.

I feel that with the skills, experience, and contacts in the industry that I would bring to Witten, further discussion of my compensation would be appropriate.

Thank you very much for your consideration.

Sincerely,

Lisa Wong

Email: [email protected]

Phone: 203-555-1234

Letter Requesting Additional Compensation

Here’s an example of a letter requesting additional compensation. The writer makes a counter salary offer with claims to back up the request.

Letter Example

Subject Line: Suzanne Pavillion – Compensation

Dear Ms. Montagne,

Thank you very much for offering me the position of Senior Sales Associate at The Revelation Company. The opportunity looks very interesting, and I am sure that I would find the position rewarding. 

I am hoping that we can discuss the possibility of adding a 5% commission to my base salary, as my 15-year track record in sales Find Rolodex of contacts will enable me to bring additional revenue to the company.

Please let me know if we can discuss this before I make a decision about accepting your offer.

Thank you for your consideration.

Respectfully yours,

Suzanne Pavilion

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13 Tips to Prepare for Salary Negotiation

Counter offer letter. Here are all the tips you need to prepare for salary negotiation:

1. Start by Evaluating What you Have to Offer

Before you start negotiating pay, you need to know just how much value you can bring to a company. There are various things that can affect your pay, including:

1. Take into consideration the cost of living in your chosen location. For example, because living costs are higher in San Francisco than in Minneapolis, you could need a higher wage for the same set of tasks. How to counter a job offer.

2. Years of industry experience: If the job description calls for 3-5 years of experience and you have more than that, you may be eligible for a higher wage.

3. Years of leadership experience: If the employer likes or demands leadership qualities and you achieve or surpass their expectations, you may be entitled to increased pay.

4. Depending on the role or sector, relevant bachelor’s, master’s, PhD, or specialist degree programs can affect your income.

‣ Career level: As you progress further in your career, you should expect a better pay range.

Niche or technical abilities that require time to master may earn you more money. How to counter a job offer.

‣ Licenses and certifications: Certain licenses or certifications may be required or preferred by an employer. If you already have them, you may be in a better position to ask for more money. How to counter a job offer.

When you begin your salary negotiation, be sure to reiterate why you’ll be a valuable employee and consider using the above factors to justify your desired salary. Counteroffer letter.

2. Research the Market Average

Having this data can help support a more successful negotiation and can be found by using Indeed Salaries.

Knowing the market average can give you a good baseline for your salary request and can even be used as justification. How to counter a job offer.

This tool uses salaries listed from past and present job postings on Indeed as well as data submitted anonymously by other Indeed users. Here are some questions to consider as you begin your market research:

‣ What is the national average salary for the position?

‣ What is the average in your geographic location and in cities nearby?

‣ How much do similar companies in your area pay employees in this position?

‣ Visit Indeed’s Salary Calculator to get a free, personalized pay range based on your location, industry and experience.

3. Prepare Your Talking Points

As you’re developing negotiation notes, it might be helpful to answer the following question as a framework for your conversation:

Why do you feel you deserve a higher salary than the one the employer is offering? Put together a few talking points before you contact the employer and be as specific as possible. Those details might include information like:

‣ Results you’ve achieved in previous roles such as goals you’ve met, the revenue you’ve helped drive or awards you earned. If possible, use actual numbers. How to counter a job offer.

‣ Years of industry experience, particularly if you have more experience than the employer stated as a minimum requirement.

‣ Skills or certifications, especially if they are in high demand within your industry.

‣ Average salaries being offered by other similar employers for similar roles Counter offer letter.

4. Schedule a Time to Discuss

Make contact with the recruiter or recruiting manager to schedule a phone interview. While email negotiation is allowed, having the chat over the phone is strongly recommended. How to counter a job offer.

You can have a back-and-forth dialogue, express gratitude, and clearly clarify your expectations by speaking on the phone or in person.

As the recruiter or hiring manager will be advocating for your wage to the decision-makers, try to be respectful and clear.

5. Rehearse With a Trusted Friend

Practicing your talking points will help you acquire confidence and spot places where you can improve. The greatest approach to practice is in front of a trustworthy friend or colleague who can offer constructive criticism.

Alternatively, you can use a camera to record your chat or speak in front of a mirror.

This stage is particularly crucial because talking about money might be awkward at times, but the more you practice, the more at ease you’ll be when the time comes to have the conversation.

6. Be Confident

It’s just as crucial to deliver your negotiation with confidence as it is to express what you mean. The more self-assurance you project, the more likely the employer is to take your input seriously.

Arrogance, or an inflated perception of one’s own significance, should not be mistaken with confidence, which is an appreciation of one’s own strengths and traits. How to counter a job offer.

Lack of confidence can also lead to over-explaining or apologizing for your request, both of which are counterproductive in a negotiation. Instead, confidently and simply state your requested salary, including a brief summary of your reasoning.

Keep in mind that you’re providing a valuable set of abilities and experience to the company. The pay an employer offers should account for the value you provide.

Prepare yourself with market salary and personal value data if you believe the employer’s initial offer is below the value that matches your talents and experiences.

That validates your request, and you should feel confident in your decision to ask for more.

7. Lead with Gratitude

You’ve undoubtedly spent a lot of time and effort applying for the job and interviewing for it by the time you reach the job offer stage of the hiring process.

Because the employer has invested time in the process, it’s critical that you acknowledge this and express gratitude for their consideration.

Include any specific reasons for your interest in the employment, such as the culture or the product.

Even if you decide to decline the offer, you should do so in a courteous and professional manner. After all, you never know what prospects they may have in the future for you. How to counter a job offer.

8. Ask for the Top of Your Range

Giving the employer a slightly higher number than your aim is a basic tenet of wage negotiation. This way, even if they lower their offer, you’ll still have a wage offer you can accept.

If you provide a wage range, the company will almost certainly err on the low end, so be sure the lowest value you submit is still a fair amount.

9. Share Job-related Expenses You’re Incurring

Another reason you may ask for an increased salary is to cover any costs you’re accumulating by taking the job.

For example, if you’re relocating to a new city for the job, you’ll have to pay moving expenses as well as any costs associated with selling or leasing your current home.

If you’re taking a position further away from home, you’ll have to factor in commute expenses such as train fare or gas and wear and tear on your vehicle.

It’s not unusual for candidates to ask employers to adjust the salary to account for expenses related to accepting the position.

10. Prepare for Tough Questions

Recruiters and hiring managers negotiate often, so they will likely be prepared to ask important, sometimes intimidating questions to figure out your motivations. How to counter a job offer.

It’s important not to get rattled by these questions and to remain honest. Some questions you can expect include:

‣ Are we your top choice?

‣ If we come up in salary will you accept the position?

‣ Do you have any other offers? immediately

11. Be flexible

Even if the employer is unable to provide the salary amount you want, they may be able to offer other forms of compensation.

For example, you may be able to negotiate more stock options, extra vacation days, a sign-on bonus or additional work-from-home days to combat a lengthy commute.

Be ready to ask for alternatives in a situation where the employer immediately lets you know they cannot increase the salary offer. In some cases, they may be just as valuable (or more so) than a paycheck.

12. Ask Questions

If the person you’re negotiating with seems surprised, reacts negatively or immediately rejects your counter, try to remain confident and calm. Meet their reaction with open-ended questions to find out more information and keep the conversation going. How to counter a job offer.

Examples of questions include, “What is the budget of this position based on?”, ”What information do you need from me to make a decision?, ”Are there other negotiables available besides salary?

13. Don’t Be Afraid to Walk Away

In some cases, an employer may not be able to meet your minimum salary requirement or offer additional benefits that make it worth your while.

Or the employer may counter-offer with a salary that’s higher than their first offer but not as high as your request. In this case, you’ll need to decide if the job is worth the lesser amount.

If it’s less stressful than your current position, closer to home or offers you more flexibility or more free time, you may be open to taking a lower salary.

However, if not, you should consider walking away and seeking other opportunities elsewhere.

how to counter a job offer

What to Do After You Submit a Counteroffer Letter

While you wait for the employer to respond to your proposal, consider any deal-breakers the bare minimum terms you are willing to accept in a counteroffer.

Is there a certain salary or set of benefits that you are unwilling to negotiate on? Think about how you will respond if the counteroffer falls below these terms.

Be prepared for any response from the employer. He or she can respond in one of the following ways:

‣ Request to meet with you in person to negotiate your compensation

‣ Accept any or all of your changes

‣ Reject some or all of the requests

‣ Provide another counteroffer

If the employer rejects your proposal or provides another counteroffer, decide whether to take the counteroffer, put in a new counteroffer, or walk away.

If you accept the counteroffer, get the new offer in writing so there is no confusion when you start the job.

How to Decide on a Counteroffer

Salary is an important factor to consider when deciding on a counteroffer—specifically, how much you need to comfortably meet your needs in the place where you live.

But it’s prudent to think about the whole compensation package as well.

Consider other non-salary compensation changes that you can ask for, such as relocation costs, insurance, signing bonuses, vacation and sick days, and other benefits.

You can also include office-specific benefits, such as your office space, hours, or telecommuting options.

Look into the typical salary for people in the job you want, both within the company and nationally, through an online salary calculator.

Once you have a sense of your worth, you can make a more informed decision about your desired compensation package. How to counter a job offer. How to counter a job offer.

Letter Requesting a Meeting

This sample counter offer letter requests a meeting to discuss the compensation package that was offered.

Letter Example

Subject Line: Lisa Wong–Job Offer

Dear Ms. Gonzalez,

Thank you for your offer of the position of Regional Manager of Product Development for the Witten Company. I am impressed with the depth of knowledge of your development team and believe that my experience will help to maximize the profitability of the department.

I would like to meet with you regarding the salary and benefits you have offered before I make a final decision. I feel that with the skills, experience, and contacts in the industry that I would bring to Witten, further discussion of my compensation would be appropriate.

Thank you very much for your consideration.

Sincerely,

Lisa Wong

Email: [email protected]

Phone: 203-555-1234

Letter Requesting Additional Compensation

Here’s an example of a letter requesting additional compensation. The writer makes a counter salary offer with claims to back up the request.

Letter Example

Subject Line: Suzanne Pavillion – Compensation

Dear Ms. Montagne,

Thank you very much for offering me the position of Senior Sales Associate at The Revelation Company. The opportunity looks very interesting, and I am sure that I would find the position rewarding.

I am hoping that we can discuss the possibility of adding a 5% commission to my base salary, as my 15-year track record in sales and Rolodex of contacts will enable me to bring additional revenue to the company.

Please let me know if we can discuss this before I make a decision about accepting your offer.

Thank you for your consideration.

Respectfully yours,

Suzanne Pavilion

READ ALSO!!!

What to Do After You Submit a Counteroffer Letter

While you wait for the employer to respond to your proposal, consider any deal-breakers—the bare minimum terms you are willing to accept in a counteroffer.

Is there a certain salary or set of benefits that you are unwilling to negotiate on? Think about how you will respond if the counteroffer falls below these terms.

Be prepared for any response from the employer. He or she can respond in one of the following ways:

‣ Request to meet with you in person to negotiate your compensation

‣ Accept any or all of your changes

‣ Reject some or all of the requests

‣ Provide another counteroffer

If the employer rejects your proposal or provides another counteroffer, decide whether to take the counteroffer, put in a new counteroffer, or walk away.

If you accept the counteroffer, get the new offer in writing so there is no confusion when you start the job.

counter

Frequently Asked Questions

Here are detailed answers to some frequently asked questions:

1. Can I show my offer letter to a different company?

Do you want to show the offer letter of company A to Company B? Why so that you can get a better offer or company B is better in some areas and u want this company to match the offer.

In both cases, you can get what you want from the companies if they have a flexible budget.

My suggestion would be clear with the objectives. Even if the intention of getting more salary in the company B then say so. Recruiters understand you are also looking for more salary and nowadays they are ok with it.


2. How long should I expect to hear after a counter offer?

To be clear, it sounds like you received an offer of employment, and have countered with another proposal—presumably for more money, or something similar to that.

It can take days to get a counter-offer approved, or minutes.

In the event that it takes more than a day, the company should be keeping in touch with you every 24 or 48 hours, to keep you engaged, and to give you some sense of progress or where things stand.

If they’re not keeping you abreast of developments, check in with them after 48 hours (two business days not weekend days!), and ask how long they expect it will take before they come back with a response.


3. Should you always counter a salary offer?

No. A counteroffer is a rejection of the offer. How to counter a job offer.

If you receive an offer that is unacceptable, you should say that you have a minimum salary requirement that must be met. But if the salary offer is reasonable, don’t count just to see if you can get a few thousand dollars more.


4. How do I negotiate salary after receiving the offer letter?

You can negotiate and offer “anytime” before you accept and start. As long as you have not accepted the offer letter, the whole ‘negotiation’ is still in play.

That said, if you try to make a counteroffer be prepared for them to turn you down, why??? because that’s their right.

The offer they made is considered offer “A”.

Once you counter that, that’s now considered a “new offer” and that’s now offer “B”. They can accept of deny your offer for more money. That’s contract law.

That Said, once you make Offer-B / Counter-Offer; It’s considered by Default that you “Rejected and Declined” Offer-A. That means by default Offer-A is no longer available.

Unless they counter back we are only offering you the Terms of Offer-A. (That’s just how Contract-Law works)

To accept Offer-A; you must accept it “as-is” without any changes.


5. How can I ask for a salary hike after accepting the offer letter?

Now so that you have accepted an offer without considering what you actually wanted, you should revisit and check if the job you accepted is what you want or not.

Second, as many others mentioned here that its not professional to re-negotiate the offer but If you have a question in your mind and feel you are worth more anyway you cannot join them.

Hence, pick up a call with the hiring manager/ HR who ever spoke to you or you are dealing with. Put your point across (Be Blunt) and leave the decision to them.

Depending upon – your reasons they will take a decision – either you will get what you want or you will be shot down (not literary).

Next time ask for your worth and stick by the number.


6. How do I ask HR to send in the formal offer letter?

Do it over a mail or a formal letter


7. Can I negotiate for my benefits after I accepted the job offer?

Though it is a risky step to take, you can definitely negotiate your benefits after accepting the job offer.


8. Can you lose a job offer by negotiating salary?

Yes. If the company does not agree with your offer, they can always decline.


9. Should I negotiate salary after accepting the offer letter?

After accepting the offer! You probably negotiated before. You received an offer. You accepted the same. Are you now serious to join! Getting an offer is a great thing.

You should join now. If you are now thinking you should have got a little more pay, leave it now. Life is a long way, you will get a rise later. Join now, give me another year’s time.

Try elsewhere and if you get a much better offer than this then resign and change jobs. Job in hand is a much better situation than being idle. Someone also taken adversely idle for a longer period in the job market.

Next time remember to negotiate at the right time before you get an offer. Also, negotiate properly to win and not lose.


10. Is it all right to show the offer letter to my current employer?

If you sense no risk involved, then yes. But unless it’s totally necessary.


Please let us know how this article helped you, by leaving a comment in the comment box below. Feel free to share this information with friends and loved ones.

CSN Team.

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